Tag Archives: Mo

Music: Top 5 Videos

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Tinie Tempah feat. Jess Glynne – Not Letting Go

Major Lazer and DJ Snake feat. MØ – Lean On

Rixton – We All Want The Same Thing

Echosmith and Lindsey Stirling – Bright

Nick Jonas – Jealous

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Book: Inkdeath

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1905294840.01.LZZZZZZZI have now finished reading the Inkheart Trilogy by Cornelia Funke. Since I have written blog posts recommending the first two books of the trilogy, Inkheart and Inkspell, I thought it would only be appropriate to comment on the third book.

Before reading this post, I encourage you to read my posts on the former two books, as what I have to say here will only be a short addition to that.

Inkdeath continues exactly as Inkspell does. The narrative only moves on about two weeks and the structure of this book continues to match that of the previous books. Cornelia’s writing is as flawless as ever showing multiple points of view and following different characters in different settings in the book at the same time.

Inkdeath’s title is extremely apt. I’ll leave that to your imagination rather than ruin the story but it is worth noting that the narrative takes a slightly darker turn which is tense and exciting and at times, I have to admit, entirely heart wrenching.

The ending to this book, and therefore, the ending of the trilogy, is really quite nice. I enjoyed reading the ending profusely. Although, I don’t particularly think that all loose ends are tied up, or that the relationships are perfect between all the characters and I do believe that the story isn’t finished. In other words, I would enjoy reading more about the Inkworld. Despite this opinion, the ending does put the readers’ mind to rest and gives an outlook into the characters’ lives beyond this trilogy.

I thoroughly enjoyed this trilogy and I certainly recommend it even if you only read Inkheart (since I still believe that is the best book in the entire series). Thank you for reading!

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PS. I would love if Cornelia Funke expanded the trilogy by including the Inkheart story from the book as a novel of it’s own and a story showing how Meggie grew up and got married and so on. Wishful thinking and all…

Disclaimer – I do not own the photo, it is from: http://www.storysnoops.com/detail.php?id=520

Book: Inkspell

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Onto the second book in the Inkheart trilogy (as I recommended Inkheart last week)… Inkspell by Cornelia Funke (published in 2005). Disclaimer: there are going to be spoilers for Inkheart in this recommendation since it follows on from t553808he same story. If you haven’t read Inkheart don’t read this.

The Blurb reads as ‘Let the imaginary become real… Although a year has passed, not a day goes by without Meggie thinking of the extraordinary events of Inkheart, and the story whose characters strode out of the pages, and changed her life for ever. But for Dustfinger, the fire-eater, torn from his world of words, the need to return has become desperate. When he finds a crooked storyteller with the magical ability to read him back, he sets in motion a dangerous reversal that sees the characters of Inkheart transported to a charmed Inkworld, about to be fought over by rival rebels and princes.’

This book has all the same things to it which made me like Inkheart before. The characters are amazing, the narrative is cleverly written and this is especially seen at the beginning of the novel as Funke makes subtle differences between Resa’s relationship with Meggie and Mo compared to Mo’s relationship with Meggie and it makes it apparent that just because the family is reunited doesn’t mean that Resa didn’t miss out on nine years of her family’s life, and that time still needs to be caught up.

Funke’s writing is especially brilliant when it comes to describing the new world, the Inkworld. She also takes the reader through various time shifts and switches between scenes without causing confusion. Throughout the novel there can be sets of characters in four different places and Funke carefully goes between these groups. It is flawlessly well done.

Another brilliant book in the Inkheart trilogy; now onto the third one… I have to say I still like Inkheart a little bit more, but it was interesting to see the Inkworld and to see all the twists and turns as the story developed.

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Disclaimer – I do not own the picture, it is from: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28195.Inkspell

Book: Inkheart

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inkheartFinally I have finished reading a whole book, and a pretty chunky one at that. This week I’m recommending Inkheart by Cornelia Funke (published in 2003). I had originally watched the 2008 film before I realised that it was actually based on a book. I was inspired to read the trilogy (Inkheart, Inkspell, Inkdeath) and as I write this I’m half way through the second book.

I think the most important part of the book that appeals to me is its extraordinary concept. The book is about people who are able to read characters out of their books. A skill that only a handful of people in the world have and a skill that only a few people care to demonstrate. It’s an extremely complex concept and is well explained in the novel so that the reader doesn’t get confused; although things do become even clearer in the second novel.

I think it’s apt to insert the novel’s blurb now (because if I keep going, I’ll end up spoiling something): ‘Dare to read aloud… Meggie loves books. So does her father, Mo, a bookbinder, although he has never read aloud to her since her mother mysteriously disappeared. They live quietly until the night a stranger knocks at their door. He has come with a warning that forces Mo to reveal an extraordinary secret – a storytelling secret that will change their lives for ever.’

The characters are fantastic. I genuinely love them, even the ones you should hate. Mo and Meggie have such an amazing and loving relationship as Father and daughter, Elinor goes through such a massive character development, Capricorn is a captivating villain and finally, Dustfinger is an incredibly complex and interesting character and as such is my favourite of the book.

These characters are not only well created and described, Cornelia Funke has been able to show the many points-of-view, and the many thoughts of her many characters, and through this, has been able to deepen the characterisation without utterly confusing the reader. The novel is seamless in its ability to show so much in such a subtle style.

In addition, the author is amazingly well-read and this is shown through her knowledge of so many things relating to books from simply reading a lot and knowing about trades like Mortimer’s, in the novel, in bookbinding and being a book doctor, so to speak. The book is structured by chapters, of which each chapter begins with a quote from another work of literature. This is a format that is the same throughout the trilogy and it’s not only incredibly informative and interesting and proves how well-read Funke is, it stands as an introduction to each chapter and gives some form of foreshadowing or a notion of where the chapter stands in the whole of the narrative.

As a stand-alone novel or as part of the trilogy, this is a very well-written, brilliant book. I think the characters are superb and that every inch of the story is told in detail. It is this quality of the book that makes it hard to put it down, as the narrative flows so well and ever so flawlessly.

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Disclaimer – I do not own the picture, it is from: http://www.adazing.com/young-adult-book-covers/