Tag Archives: money

Quote: John Cleese

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john-cleese‘He, who laughs most, learns best.’

‘The really good idea is always traceable back quite a long way, often to a not very good idea which sparked off another idea that was only slightly better, which somebody else misunderstood in such a way that they then said something which was really rather interesting.’

‘If you want creative workers, give them enough time to play.’

‘I have several times made a poor choice by avoiding a necessary confrontation.’

‘I think that money spoils most things, once it becomes the primary motivating force.’

‘A wonderful thing about true laughter is that it just destroys any kind of system of dividing people.’

‘I’m not saying Obama is right on everything. Of course not. He may be wrong on a number of things. But what I do know is that he behaves like a very, very sane man almost all the time.’

‘Now most people do not want an ordinary life in which they do a job well, earn the respect of their collaborators and competitors, bring up a family and have friends. That’s not enough anymore, and I think that is absolutely tragic – and I’m not exaggerating – that people feel like a decent, ordinary, fun life is no longer enough.’

Disclaimer – I do not own the above photo, it is from:  http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/comedy/an-evening-with-john-cleese-review-second-coming-invokes-gratitude-20140409-36d6f.html
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TV Show: Still Open All Hours

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asjdfh I’ve recently been watching Still Open All Hours, a BBC programme, which is a sequel series to the 1976 Open All Hours show that lasted for four seasons. Open All Hours, which has been (and still is), repeated endlessly on various channels such as BBC One and Comedy Gold, was a part of my childhood. I absolutely loved watching Ronnie Barker and David Jason together in Arkwright’s shop.

Open All Hours was a sitcom set in a small Grocer’s shop. Albert Arkwright (Ronnie Barker) is the tight owner with a stammer. He is joined by his nephew Granville (David Jason), a young boy caught between his long working hours and his social life. The show follows their management of the shop and their interactions with their customers and neighbours.

Still Open All Hours, the sequel series, commissioned for six special episodes, follows Granville (still David Jason) as the owner of the shop, running it with the help of his son, Leroy (James Baxter). Granville now has the occasional stammer when referring to his uncle and has grown up to live by the standards that Arthur Arkwright himself did, this includes how little money he felt comfortable spending.open-all-hours-1

In addition, some of the neighbours and customers in the new series are the same characters played by the same actors as in the old series adding a real sense of how the community has grown with Arkwright’s shop and giving continuity between the two shows.

I love the show for its standalone qualities but I most enjoy the fact it brings that little gem from the past to those who used to love the show and to an entirely new generation. I think the show is a lovely tribute to the late Ronnie Barker who was and still is loved by many across the nation. I just think the whole concept is extremely heart-warming and I’m sure that David Jason, James Baxter and the entire cast of Still Open All Hours would make Ronnie feel very loved and very proud.

TweetingRawr

Disclaimer – I do own the pictures, they are from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2133936/Shopkeeper-inspired-Ronnie-Barkers-Arkwright-character-Open-All-Hours-dies-aged-78.html and http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/christmas/10531771/Still-Open-All-Hours-David-Jason-back-to-the-shop-floor.html.

Tradition: Remembrance Day

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remembrance In England, and perhaps for many across the world, it is once again the time of year where we remember those who have fallen and wear a poppy to show our support of those dead  from war and of those still fighting wars.

For those who are not familiar with the Remembrance Day tradition, it is a day ‘to commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts’. Traditionally, Remembrance Day is celebrated on the closest Sunday to the 11th of November but two minute silences are held on both the Sunday and on the 11th, known as Armistice Day. The Nation takes the time around the 11th of November to create memorials, lay and wear poppies which are sold to raise money for The Royal British Legion (which provide welfare for our service men and women, veterans, and their families).

It always makes me incredibly proud to see the effort that everyone puts into showing respect during this time and along with many, I will be having a two minute silence at 11am tomorrow with my poppy proudly displayed.

The reason for this blog post is that I find Remembrance day extremely important and a day that deserves so much respect as do the men and women it commemorates. I could not have posted any other blog so close to the 11th of November.In-Flanders-Fields

TweetingRawr

PS. For more information do not hesitate to visit these websites: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day and http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-involved

Disclaimer – I do not own the images, they are from: https://www.gwc.org.uk/news/lest-we-forget/ and http://runninggrooveshark.com/tag/in-flanders-fields/ and I gained information from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Sunday and http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-involved/poppy-appeal