Tag Archives: Sherlock Holmes

Quote: Stephen Fry

Standard

fav-1107‘Love in all eight tones and all five semitones of the world’s full octave.’

‘Taste every fruit of every tree in the garden at least once. It is an insult to creation not to experience it fully. Temperance is wickedness.’

‘It is a cliche that most cliches are true, but then like most cliches, that cliche is untrue.’

‘It only takes a room of Americans for the English and Australians to realise how much we have in common.’

‘They are just 100 per cent bear, whereas human beings feel we’re not 100 per cent human, that we’re always letting ourselves down. We’re constantly striving towards something, to some fulfilment.’

‘My life, at least, is divided between writing and performing and mixtures of the two.’

‘An original idea. That can’t be too hard. The library must be full of them.’

TweetingRawr

Disclaimer – I do not own the above image, it is from: http://www.neworldnews.com/2013/06/07/dear-mr-fry/

Film: Mr Holmes

Standard

mr_holmes_ver2_xlgA friend of mine recently invited me to see Mr Holmes at a local cinema and as much that is what I’m recommending today.

I love everything Sherlock Holmes, especially the modern adaptations of the books such as the BBC series Sherlock starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, the two films starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law and lastly, the American series, Elementary, starring Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu. From that I figured, I had to watch this new adaptation starring Ian McKellen.

‘The story is set in 1947, following a long-retired Holmes living in a Sussex village with his housekeeper and [her] rising detective son. But then he finds himself haunted by an unsolved 30-year old case. Holmes memory isn’t what it used to be, so he only remembers fragments of the case: a confrontation with an angry husband, [and] a secret bond with his beautiful but unstable wife.’ (IMDB)

This magical story sees Mr Holmes in his self-made isolation from the world as he lives his old age. Sherlock is suffering with his aging, as his brain doesn’t work how it used to; he can’t remember his old cases as much. The film sees Sherlock go over his one unfinished case with the help of young Roger, the housekeeper’s son. While Roger helps Sherlock with the case, Sherlock teaches Roger the art of bee-keeping, something that Sherlock Holmes, in his legacy, enjoys. This shows an amazing relationship grow between the two, but not everything is as perfect as it seems for Mrs. Munro, the housekeeper, who struggles to look after a stubborn old man while ensuring her child is safe from harm. She eventually considers leaving Mr Holmes to work in another household.

I really enjoyed the film, it was very simple in its concept and the film isn’t particularly punchy (like many of the newer adaptations) but it offers a chance for the current generation to see Sherlock in a different way; it is very unique and interesting. There wasn’t a large cast and most of the film only focuses on Sherlock, Roger and Mrs. Munro but this just seemed to add to the magic of it all.

I truly recommend this film, if you haven’t seen it, even if you don’t know much about Sherlock Holmes. (However, this is the only modern version that sees very little of Holmes’ sidekick Dr. John Watson).

TweetingRawr

Disclaimer – I do not own the above image, it is from: http://www.screenrelish.com/2015/06/01/sir-ian-mckellens-mr-holmes-steps-out-of-the-shadows-for-new-poster/

Film: The Man From U.N.C.L.E

Standard

image004MV5BMTc2NjQ4ODYyNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODA3OTU5NTE@._V1_SX214_AL_Yesterday I was very fortunate to go see The Man From U.N.C.L.E at the cinema. It was an insanely good film and therefore I must recommend it asap.

I must start by addressing the cinematography of this film, which was phenomenal, really clever and it gave a unique energy to the entire film. It is very fast paced, action-packed and has flawless scenes, especially the fight scenes and car chases. This style of editing and shot selection is very typical of the director, Guy Ritchie, who is up there in the list of my favourite directors. If you’re familiar with either of the Sherlock Holmes films with Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law, you’ll recognise the style.

Secondly, the cast is amazing. You don’t need to wait to see the film to know that you’re in for a treat. Not only are the two leads good looking, they are also up and coming popular stars right now. Who am I talking about? None other than Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer as Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin. Other members of the cast include Alicia Vikander as Gaby, Elizabeth Debicki (The Great Gatsby) as Victoria, the ever amazing Hugh Grant as Waverly and Jared Harris as Sanders.

So… onto the important part, the story. Based on the 60s TV show The Man from U.N.C.L.E starring Robert Vaughn, David McCallum and Leo Carroll, the concept of the film is that CIA Agent Napoleon Solo and KGB operative Illya Kuryakin participate in a joint mission against a mysterious criminal organisation, which is working to proliferate nuclear weapons. It may seem like a very simple story but alas, there are a few twists hidden within a very amusing plot. The relationship between the two agents is enough to keep the audience’s interest alive and makes for a lot of comedy.

With little else to say, The Man From U.N.C.L.E, is a superbly made film with incredible settings (filmed in Italy) and brilliant cast with a serious storyline matched with charm and amusement. A perfect watch indeed especially with its mix of action, adventure and comedy.

TweetingRawr

Disclaimer – I do not own the above images, they are from: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1638355/ and http://www.manfromuncle.org/